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MOTTO/CREED/RINGS
MOTTO
The Olympic motto "Citius, Altius, Fortius" is Latin for "Faster, Higher, Braver," but is universally accepted to mean "Swifter, Higher, Stronger."
CREED
"The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well."
The words of the Olympic Creed are attributed to Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic Games. De Coubertin adopted, and later quoted, the creed after hearing Ethelbert Talbot, the Bishop of Central Pennsylvania, speak at St. Paul's Cathedral on July 19, 1908, during the London Games. The service was given for the Olympic athletes, who were all invited. Talbot's exact words that day were: "The important thing in these Olympics is not so much winning as taking part."
RINGS
The Olympic symbol — five interlocked rings — represents the union of Africa, America, Asia, Oceania and Europe, and the meeting of the athletes from throughout the world at the Olympic Games. The five colors of the rings from left to right are blue, black and red across the top and yellow and green along the bottom. The colors of the rings were chosen because at least one of these colors can be found in the flag of every nation.
2014 U.S. Olympic Team Media Guide